Riding in the Rain: Get Visible – Leader Motorcycle Accessories

Riding in the Rain: Get Visible

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In my first article, I talked about a number of ideas for finding the right gear and clothing for rainy riding. In the second I covered skills and tactics. The third article in this series gave three ideas for keeping your electronic devices (like phones etc) dry.

Now I’m going to address visibility. My focus will be on simple steps you can take to be more visible when you ride in the rain.

 

#1: Bright Colors

Like many bikers, I love black and leather. But when it comes to riding in the rain, I want to be seen at all costs. After all, decreased visibility is one of the main contributors to accidents (rain or not!).

The BEST idea is to get a bright-colored motorcycle. (In fact, some police departments and emergency services are going all-out in that regard)

But the reality is, most of us are NOT like this guy; we don’t want a neon green or bumble-bee yellow bike. I’ve never once chosen my motorcycle (in over 30 years) by the color, but rather by an intuitive desire, and I’d be willing to bet you’ve done the same.

So, the next best thing? Wear bright clothing. Take a tip from the construction industry: they wear yellow or orange to stay visible when working in a high traffic area. So why wouldn’t you do the same?

If you don’t want a neon-colored riding jacket, then wear a reflective vest.

I love my red/white/blue Conspicuity Reflective Vest, but a yellow or orange reflective vest is even better. They don’t have to LOOK like a construction vest, either - nowadays you can get very stylish vests (see Conspicuity).

#2: Extra lights

“Fog lights” aka auxiliary driving lights typically come in two varieties: lights that project a somewhat short but wide light pattern (a 30 to 35 degree spread is common) and lights that project a longer and narrower light pattern (20 degrees). Either type added to the front of your bike will make you more visible to traffic.

This article from Webbikeworld does a good job of breaking down which type of light is best for you.

 

#3: Ride Defensively

Altering your position in the lane can make you more visible by creating an abnormal driving pattern (and light pattern) that car drivers are more likely to notice. A gradual shifting to the right and left also gives you more opportunity to spot upcoming traffic situations.


Stay away from cars whenever possible, especially their
blind spot. Many riders won’t turn their head before making a lane change, especially if they’re also trying to see through a rainy windshield. If you must pass, do it quickly and get into a situation where you’re better seen by all cars on the road.

Use your brake light as a blinker by tapping on the brakes several times in quick succession. This can catch the attention of a driver behind you and/or - heaven forbid - a tailgater (which this guy is apparently expecting)!

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  • Tracey Cramer